Particle Entanglement

Once again I got involved with the conversation about particle entanglement. It was the line from the George Musser's quest blog post (mistreated by the host by the way) which lit up my involvement.

Give me a step-by-step explanation of how particle spins show the observed correlations even though neither has a determinate value in advance of being measured.

Naturally I'll try to explain phenomena through TOEBI point-of-view and there isn't too many options. Only reasonable explanation is that those spinning particles generate a FTEP-based connection from the beginning of entanglement.

FTEPs are ejected at the speed of light hence generating such a connection is possible, even in case of entangled photons. But how i.e. measuring particle spin is able to change the orientation of the other particle via that generated connection? Changing orientation of the measured particle can't influence the other particle faster than \(c\) if the mechanism behind entanglement works via eject-FTEPs-receive-FTEPs mechanism, so it must rely on some other mechanism.

What could it be? I can't figure out any other explanation than that the FTEP-based connection between entangled particles is a "solid" connection which forces those particles behave as observed. Measuring particle spin (potentially) changes particle's orientation which twists the solid connection which changes the other particle's orientation, and this happens pretty much instantaneously. How to test about it? Well, we could set up an experiment where we disturb the generated entanglement before making any measurements. Simple way to disturb such a solid FTEP-based connection would be just inserting a thick object between the flying out particles, that should break down the connection, hence no quantum correlations should be observed.

Meanwhile, I'll ponder the inner works of such FTEP-based connection. Have a great Summer!

3 thoughts on “Particle Entanglement

  1. > those spinning particles generate a FTEP-based connection from the beginning of entanglement

    Sounds possible

    > I can't figure out any other explanation than that the FTEP-based connection between entangled
    > particles is a "solid" connection which forces those particles behave as observed.

    Can you elaborate more on that "solid"

  2. Entangled particles have the opposite spins. See more https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_entanglement

    Solid in a sense that if you measure particle spin (which often alters its orientation) the measurement twists the "solid" connection between the particles hence the other particle's orientation changes immediately. Let's say that you have a stick with arrows at each ends. What happens if you rotate the other arrow? You got the picture?

    Surely such a "solid" connection must be extremely fragile and the suggested experiment is based on that fragility.

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